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+ Back to Bread: Israelis celebrate Mimouna
Pesach comes to end with Israelis attending traditional Moroccan-Jewish festivals.
Above,the Shukran family celebrate Minouna in Israel .
(photo: Channel 2 News)

Back to Bread: Israelis celebrate Mimouna

Pesach comes to end with Israelis attending traditional Moroccan-Jewish festivals.

Above,the Shukran family celebrate Minouna in Israel .

(photo: Channel 2 News)

The treatment model, known as Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is the culmination of nearly 15 years of collaboration between the two professors and asserts that family therapy is more effective than standard one-on-one treatments for suicidal youths. The team examined the effects of family therapy on the level of suicidal symptoms in adolescents struggling with anger, substance abuse, depression, and suicide.

Read More: NoCamels

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Grow From Each Moment
by Rabbi Zelig Pliskin

Right now, in each present moment, your life is perfect for you to continue fulfilling your life’s mission. Each moment of life provides you with opportunities to develop your character and elevate your life.

Some moments will give you exactly the experience you would want. Grow from each of these moments. Some experiences will not be exactly what you would choose. You may wish to be someplace else or to do something different at that moment. Grow from each of these moments.

Your thoughts can make every moment meaningful.

((Life is Now: Creating moments of joy, courage, kindness, and serenity, p. 68))

+ idfonline:

Me and my grandmother, Artemis Miron, 85 from Jerusalem. Born in Greece, survived Birkenau. 

Help us to commemorate Holocaust survivors with the hashtag #WeAreHere: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiSaWuIikqs

idfonline:

Me and my grandmother, Artemis Miron, 85 from Jerusalem. Born in Greece, survived Birkenau.

Help us to commemorate Holocaust survivors with the hashtag #WeAreHere: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiSaWuIikqs

Posted 2 hours ago
+ Sunrise over Jerusalem mountains. Photo by Eddy Cogan

Sunrise over Jerusalem mountains. 

Photo by Eddy Cogan

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Drifters-in-the-sea: salps bloom off the coast of New Zealand. Credit: Seacology

(Phys.org) —If diapers choke landfills and sea creatures plague tourism and invade power stations, an Israeli startup seeks to promote a single answer to both problems, according to The Times of Israel report filed earlier this month. The company is developing technology that makes use of jellyfish to construct super-absorbing material that can be used for diapers and applications such as medical sponges.

Hydromash is the name given to the flexible, strong material being developed by the startup, Cine’al. Ofer Du-Nour is chairman and president of Cine’al ; the product is based on research by Tel Aviv University’s Dr. Shachar Richter.

The material, said The Times of Israel, is highly absorbent: “Highly absorbent products are made of synthetic materials such as super-absorbing polymers (SAP). The challenge was to find a  that was at least as absorbent.”

The Israeli researchers turned to , with bodies that can absorb and hold high volumes of liquids without disintegrating or dissolving. They have a processing technique that results in a material called Hydromash, capable of absorbing high volumes of water and blood in seconds. The Tel Aviv University researchers added nanoparticles for antibacterial properties. This can compete with conventional products for absorbency, and biodegrades in less than 30 days. The report said it could also compete with SAPs on price. (SAPs stand for super-absorbent polymers, which are materials with the ability to absorb and retain large volumes of water and aqueous solutions. They are made from lightly cross-linked polyacrylic acid; they are key ingredients in disposable diapers, feminine hygiene and adult incontinence products.)

As important, jellyfish could serve, not threaten, the economy, becoming commodities rather than headaches. Jellyfish inhabit every major ocean. Infestations trouble the tourist industry and scientists alike, with swarms finding beach environments hospitable, driving swimmers away, but also gathering near intake pipes and clogging them up.

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 Nofar

Nofar Vaknin studies elementary math education at the Oranim Academic College of Education. When Nofar met Lital at the beginning of the school year, her biggest fear was that the girl’s extended family – living together in one apartment – and complicated home life could interfere with her studies.
 
Nofar’s misgivings were soon laid to rest: The family members were very involved in one another’s lives, but they knew when to keep their distance. Nofar and Lital began working together on Hebrew, math and science. They completed homework assignments, studied for tests and, when they finished with these, put on makeup, sang karaoke and played board games.

Everything was going well until, two months into her tutoring, Nofar got a phone call. It was Lital’s mother, telling her that the girl had undergone an operation to remove a malignant growth from her brainstem, and she was now about to undergo a series of difficult treatments.

Nofar says: “I understood that I was about to undergo a change in my life as well, to be involved in Lital’s transition from a completely normal child to one in an extreme situation, including changes in her mood, her physical state, her social situation, her studies, her feelings – all of it falling on her at once!”

Nofar’s PERACH coordinator suggested that she seriously weigh the possibility of stopping the tutoring. Nofar, after some deep reflection, decided to stay on, though she admits that the decision was not an easy one. In a final report on her year’s activities she wrote: “Before each meeting, I hesitated, thinking ‘what will it be this time? What will I see when I open her door?’ There were many surprises, most of them unpleasant and hard to cope with. Yet I discovered that when I saw Lital, my reserves would refill, my tension would dissolve and I would feel that I could never abandon her. Every time, I had to overcome my anxiety, but afterward I would be filled with satisfaction that I had not skipped the meeting.”

Visiting Lital in the children’s oncology ward, Nofar helped her talk about her difficulties, took her to the hospital art room to create artworks and helped her maintain her friendships with her classmates. When the girl was home, Nofar took her on a shopping outing, to an amusement park and a costume parade for Purim.

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Tangerine Dream to perform in Israel

Iconic German band to give concert in Tel Aviv’s Charles Bronfman Auditorium on May 18. Band founder tells Ynet it is no small thing to play in Israel as German band after ‘the most horrific crime initiated by the regime of Germany.’

The star of the show will always be the music itself. That is what Edgar Froese wants to demonstrate the audience. “People who attend a Tangerine Dream concert will see and hear servants to the music at work,” stresses Froese, head of the German electronic music band.

The band Tangerine Dream will play the first time in Israel in a few weeks and see the beautiful country, Froese says. On May 18th the concert will take place in Tel Aviv at the Charles Bronfman Auditorium.

For Froese, it is no small thing to play in Israel as part of a German band, after “the most horrific crime which had been initiated by the regime of Germany from 1933 to 1945”. He hopes “that the younger people in Israel are open-minded and tolerant against a different and new generation born in Germany,” but he also understands “those Israelis who can’t forgive and can’t forget, have unfortunately many reasons for such reactions.”

+ Oops!  A Domino’s Ad during Peasch last week.
somebody in corporate didn’t get the memo … . 

Oops!  A Domino’s Ad during Peasch last week.

somebody in corporate didn’t get the memo … .